Category Archives: Uncategorized

What I See When I Close My Eyes gallery

I constructed the façade of a giant “tree” in a small room. Five openings in the tree gave views into five dioramas of enchanted scenes. A soundtrack of natural sounds and voices played. I wanted visitors to remember the feeling they had as children, looking into an opening in a tree and fully expecting to see a magical world there.

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Walk Through the Door gallery

I created this work based on Burning Man’s theme that year: Rites of Passage. I made a space that was sparely sketched; no actual walls. But it had doors. When you step through a door, you have gone somewhere, even if only a few feet. You’ve made a passage. The room created by the doors and metal rods was a place to stop for a moment and pay attention to time passing. The narration in the video was created for an indoor version of the piece.

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What I See When I Close My Eyes

Year of Completion: 2010
Medium: various
Size: 9′ x 3′ x 6′

I constructed the façade of a giant “tree” in a small room. Five openings in the tree gave views into five dioramas of enchanted scenes. A soundtrack of natural sounds and voices played. I wanted visitors to remember the feeling they had as children, looking into an opening in a tree and fully expecting to see a magical world there.

View the slideshow here.

In the Forest

Year of Completion: 2011
Medium: paper, bailing wire, metal tubing, toys
Size: 5′ x 5′ x 25′

This was a collaboration between five artists to create a forest experience in a gallery. My contribution was one of the three 25 foot “trees,” the soundtrack, projected photographs and the threshold of fishing line and strands of fabric. The “trees” were moveable by visitors along their tracks. Moving a sculpture tripped a random sound effect to play. Photographs were projected from four projectors onto the sculptures.

View the slideshow here.

Walk Through the Door

Year of Completion: 2011
Medium: fabric, metal rods, springs, rope, wood, doors
Size: 9′ x 9′ x 15′

I created this work based on Burning Man’s theme that year: Rites of Passage. I made a space that was sparely sketched; no actual walls. But it had doors. When you step through a door, you have gone somewhere, even if only a few feet. You’ve made a passage. The room created by the doors and metal rods was a place to stop for a moment and pay attention to time passing.

View the slideshow here.

This Is What I Saw, This Is What I Heard

Year of Completion: 2011
Medium: wood, paper, pins
Size: 18″ x 18″ x 6″

A block of wood is marked and scarred. It has paint smudges and gouges. What’s the story of this block? What did it see and hear, before it came here? This work points out each damaged, marked spot and spins a little tale about what might have happened. It’s a story that’s purely conjectural, overheard, elided. It’s only one of many possible stories.

Another year, another block for the Pro Arts Gallery Box Art show. This time I used the physical object, but as a medium for a story that has nothing to do with the block, yet couldn’t exist without the block. A mute wooden block, or any object, witnesses a series of human events and may even be marked by them. Can we gather a story by examining the marks? Is that any less valid than making assumptions based on snippets of conversations or vague memories?

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An Ideal Block

Year of Completion: 2010
Medium: Photography and narrative voiceover
Length: 5:21

This short film is a meditation on art and perception. How can you really know a thing? How do you know that what you perceive is reality? A thing is an idea before it is a thing.  If a blind person has surgery to restore sight, that person cannot actually see. You have to be taught to see. Vision alone means nothing.

This work was created for the Pro Arts annual Box Art show. I decided to use it as a metaphor rather than a physical object that I could alter somehow. By photographing it in different ways I altered its apprearance without changing the block itself. That brought up the notion of perception and how much visual information we take for granted. If the wood block only seems to have been changed, what is the point of really changing it? What does the change mean at all?

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